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Piers Morgan Tonight

News/Business. (2013)

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CNN

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01:00:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Virtual Ch. 759 (CNN HD)

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mpeg2video

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ac3

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1920

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1080

TOPIC FREQUENCY

America 21, Sandy Hook 4, Daniel 4, Sandy 4, Casey Anthony 4, Britain 4, Rob Lowe 4, Lifelock 3, Neil 3, Peterson 3, Ms. Soto 3, John Walsh 3, Us 3, Australia 2, Iowa 2, Statehouse 2, Mr. Hutchinson 2, Piers 2, Jill 2, Gethelp 2,
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  CNN    Piers Morgan Tonight    News/Business.  (2013)  

    January 15, 2013
    12:00 - 1:00am PST  

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>> tonight, in america, the president demands action on guns. >> if there's a step we can take to save even one child from what happened in newtown, we should take that step. >> and families of newtown one month after the massacre. what will it take to protect this country's children? also the courageous father who lost his only son in sandy hook. >> my little boy is never going to come back to me. >> and john walsh of america's most wanted said nra has held congress hostage for years. plus congressman and nra point person who says this. >> there's nothing more critical to our nation's wellbeing than our children's safety. >> why he thinks the the way to stop shootings is to put armed
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guns outside every school in america. >> and why is rob lowe taking an assault against assault weapons? >> i like guns and i don't know what to do with an assault weapon. i don't know why i would want one. >> this is "piers morgan tonight." >> good evening. you're looking live at the white house where in a matter of hours, vice president joe biden is expected to hand president obama his recommendations to stop gun violence in america. the parents who lost children one month ago in newtown are speaking out. >> we want to bring about changes that will stop a tragedy such as this from happening to any community ever again. because this can happen in any community. your community. it has already happened in tucson, littletown, aurora and blacksburg.
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it has happened in our schools, theaters, places of worship, malls, and offices. >> i think it's important to be transparent in this debate. here's where i stand. i'm in favor of a ban of semiautomatic weapons and high-volume magazines. i also want to see the president increase mental health funding for all americans who need it. we'll begin with a father whose story i found very moving when we spoke last. he lost his son in the shooting at sandy hook. neil, welcome to you. >> thank you. >> it was incredibly powerful, evocative, conversation that we had. it moved millions of people, i think around the world. how are you doing, first of all? you're a month on now. >> i'm going day by day. it's a struggle. i miss my son jesse something terrible. not a minute goes by i'm not thinking of him. i'm just still heart broken over it. i maybe accept what happened a little more. i can't forget what happened.
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i'm trying to go forward every day and deal with it the best i can. >> i heard this very touching story, jesse had this ornament that he wanted to give to vicky soto, his teacher he loved, who also lost her life. >> that's true. the day before, the evening before sandy hook's shooting, we were at stew renert's in danberry, and he loved christmas, one of his many favorite holidays, but that was his favorite holiday. and he had picked out two ornaments. i'm unclear why he picked out two for ms. soto, but one was a star that was for his teacher. the other was an apple for a teacher. and he also got his mother and his brother an ornament, one
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and he had picked out two ornaments. i'm unclear why he picked out two for ms. soto, but one was a star that was for his teacher. the other was an apple for a teacher. and he also got his mother and his brother an ornament, one that said mother, and the other said brother on it. and his good friend daniel who he used to play with every saturday and took riding lessons from jesse's mom, daniel loved horses and jesse picked him out a horse ornament. jesse purchased the ornaments, $37 all together, with his own money he saved doing odd jobs or his allowance. he never got to give those ornaments out in pern to his teacher or his mom or his
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brother or daniel. and i made sure that ms. soto's family got the ornaments or received them along with his mother and brother and daniel. i just -- it was something he felt was very special. >> it says a lot about the kind of boy he was. very kind-hearted young man by all accounts. >> he was a very kind-hearted kid. he loved life to the fullest. was always happy about everything, always wanted to help people. always put other people before himself. >> there are so many issues, neil, that have arisen from what happened at sandy hook, to many people, certainly to me as a father of four children, it was a tipping point. it was something that cannot be allowed to happen without other stuff now being done to prevent or try to prevent further massacres.
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but without putting any words into your mouth, of all the things you have heard, what do you think may make a difference? what to you resonates? >> i think what happened in sandy hook was really a turning point. we had columbine and aurora and the other massacres in the malls over the years, but i think the significance with sandy hook is these were just little babies. they were young children that really had no survival instinct. they were helpless. and i think that's really what touched the hearts of everybody. >> what do you think we can sensibly do? >> i think there should be mental health for people who have mental health problems. >> better treatment, better
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funding? >> better treatment. homes, like when they had bellevue and fairfield, when they were open for the mentally insane, i think a lot of the problems society has now started back when those facilities were closed. and i think there should be stricter gun control. i'm not in favor of banning weapons or guns, but i'm definitely in favor of much more stricter background checks, regulations for gun owners. as for the assault rifles or the bushmaster military-style rifle, i really can't see why somebody would need to own a weapon like that. and especially somebody like adam lanza's mother. i still -- i can't fathom why a
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woman would want a rifle like that. >> particularly a woman who knew that her son was clearly a threat. >> exactly. exactly. >> neil, thank you for now. i'm just going to turn now to two people who know exactly what you have been going through because they also are living through the pain of what happened at sandy hook. the family members of emilie parker. welcome to you both. it's just almost too agonizing, even a month letter, to look at the little faces, to try to make any sense of it. i don't think there is any sense to be made of it at all. in terms of what we can now do, one of the theories people are putting out, particularly from the nra, loud and clear, the answer is more guns. every school should have
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somebody armed, whether it's a teacher or a janitor or a security guard outside. you're a mother of four. what is your reaction to that? >> as a mother of four, sending my kids out to school every day, i think that's why this tragedy affected so many people and hit home with so many people, is that we all go to our homes and send our kids off to school, and every day we assume that they're safe, and we have faith in the teachers and the school that everything is okay. and this exposed that we aren't safe, and that we all are vulnerable. and because so many more accidents happen with guns as they're introduced into homes and introduced into elements with children, especially, i think it presents so much more
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possibility for accidents instead of actually being helpful. but i think school safety has got to be addressed. it's a huge issue that clearly we're vulnerable to and we're all afraid as we send our kids to school. we know why we're scared of what happened there, because we all have children or know children that we're sending off as well. >> james, you spent six years in the u.s. air force and recently moved to connecticut from tucson, scene of another ghastly tragedy involving gabby giffords. you wanted to be nearer to the family. it was a devastating blow to your family. you're a military man. you have heard all of the debates now about all of the aspects, violent video games, hollywood movies, mental health, registration, background checks, so on. you don't speak for either of emilie's parents, they're not here. what is your view? >> we need better enforcement of the laws that are already put in place. and to be able to follow through with things like the background checks and -- and i mean, this is a good time for everyone to come together, to admit that something bad, something tragically bad has happened and
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has been happening. and so this is a good time for everyone to come to the middle and start the conversations. not arguments, not debates, but conversations on what needs to be done for the betterment of our communities, our nation, our world. and for me, that's -- that's the most important thing for me. >> jill, why do you think it is such a polarizing issue? the reason i ask that, in britain, we had a similar thing, 16 children murdered with guns. it was never a political debate. here, it really is. it's a real right/left thing. if you're in favor of gun control, you're a looney liberal. if you're not, you're a right wing activist or whatever. how do we get through that? >> our country is founded in such a different way, with the second amendment even being part of the constitution, it's so
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much about protecting liberties because of how we established ourselves as a country. and it's such a part of our foundation as a country. i think it has to be a part of the discussions as far as assessing where we came from as a country but also realizing the world we live in has got some problems that are directly related to safety and schools and that these tragedies are happening, we can't ignore what elements are coming into that, what factors. and there are many. >> the problem i have, james, with this is that if you look at almost any other country that has strict gun control, they have the same videos, same hollywood movies, the same kind of incidents and mental health issues, they don't have the gun murders at all, you talk about australia, forget britain, australia had a very similar
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massacre in the mid-'90s. they have 30, 40 gun murders a year to america's 11,000 to 12,000. it's a culture of violence that seems to have gotten out of control. i think that people -- i really feel there was a movement to try to do something meaningful. >> for me, you said it perfectly with the culture around guns. that's where i believe that it can start in the home. it can start with a gun-owning father teaching his child proper gun responsibility, gun accountability, gun safety. and teaching him the correct culture that should be put in place with something like that. with something that can cause damage.
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>> a culture where they have a lot of guns in people's homes, safety is a premium. i looked into this and it's true. they have very few gun murders and a lot of homes with guns. but safety is absolutely paramount. a lot of training, a lot of safety and so on. i'm sure that that would certainly help. anything that helped stem the tide of violence has got to be good. jill, how is the family doing? because it broke everybody's heart when robby gave, what, the first interview of any of the parents, and you saw this beautiful little girl. i just became a father to a little girl myself. it was heartbreaking. how are they doing, the parents and her little sisters? >> you know, time, i think, creates this stark realization of what's missing in your life.
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and i don't think it heals. i think you come to terms with it. and i think you accept it over time. they are -- i'm proud of my sister for getting up each day and taking care of her children, and i -- that's all i could ask for her. i think it's the country that needs to get up and do something. these families are the impetus for all of the rest of us who care and who see how much they're suffering and how much this affected these beautiful families, these beautiful people. they now have the country that wants to help these people grieve and help these people move forward. they need to do it by being proactive. >> i think today, speaking out the way they did and to have you guys come on and do the same in this eloquent and powerful way is exactly what needs to happen. we will keep it going. these kids are not going to die in vain. i thank you all for coming on and so bravely talking about this because it's not easy, i
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know. you have lost loved ones and they're never coming back, and it's heartbreaking. thank you very much. when we come back, a former congressman who says the best way to keep kids safe is to have armed guards in every school in america. oes! wow. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy.
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my point is not to worry about the politics. my starting point is to focus on what makes sense, what works. what should we be doing to make sure that our children are safe, and that we're reducing the incidents of gun violence. >> president obama speaking today about what it will take to keep this country's children safe. joining me now is a man who sees things differently. welcome to you, mr. hutchinson. explain to me why the answer to a massacre at a school that killed 20 young children in this hideous manner and six adults, is to arm people at every school in america, over 20,000 schools. why is that the solution? >> i don't think you're quite accurately stating what my job is. what i said is one, it should be the decision of the local school
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district as to what kind of security you have in the schools. i do believe one element of that would be a trained, armed presence for schools that particularly have a particular risk. and today, we see from sandy hook elementary that virtually every school in america has some risk. and so a logical response to that is to provide greater protection and security. but this is a decision local school districts. my job is to bring some of the best security experts in the country together and look at what we can do better in our schools to provide parents assurance their children are going to be safe. to make sure this does not happen again. but it has to be a decision by the local school district, but if i have a choice, yes, if my grandchildren have a choice of going to a school that has a trained, armed presence versus a school that doesn't, i think the
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one with the trained, armed presence there would have a much better chance of being safe. >> this is one of the theories that have been put out by the nra, which has garnered some support. i don't want to ridicule you for that. i understand many americans who listen to that think it makes perfect sense. my point is when you listen to the woman who just spoke, who had a niece who was lost in sandy hook, who is a mother of four, is concerned with having guns all around. i come from a country where we don't have any guns. it's a different culture, i get that, and i don't want to play that card with you, but there's a fear if you start loading up guns around children, what you're doing is militarizing schools. where do you stop? you have to militarize almost every children may be, and that is everywhere.
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so america becomes this sort of paramilitary country. >> piers, you're absolutely wrong. first of all, president clinton initiated the cops in the schools program. we presently have resource officers that are armed, trained guards in about one third of our schools. they're not military encampments. they're safe environments in which the children feel very secure around with that kind of protection. you think about, in your country, england has an armed presence for international flights going in and out of england in a very sensitive environment called an airplane. post-9/11, people said guns have no place in the cockpit or in the passenger planes. but in fact, they have worked very well because they're trained. >> actually, let me pick you up on that. what's been effective on planes is an outright ban on any weapons, any guns. that's what's been effective.
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the reason you dont see people using guns on planes is they have been banned. this brings me to the point of what i have been trying to get to on this show, which is it's not about removing everybody's guns in america. it's a complete fallacy when people spin out that line. it's designed, i think, to instill the kind of fear president obama talked about today. trying to make people think, oh, my god, they're coming for my gun. and what happens is a lot of americans buy more of the guns and more ammunition, so it spirals on. why can't you see the plane analogy that you brought up as the perfect example of what you should be doing, which is dealing with the chicken and not all the eggs? the chicken is the gun. the gun situation in america, to many people, seems increasingly ridiculous, where a young, deranged man could very easily access an ar-15 assault weapon and take a magazine with 100 bullets and commit mass murder. the last four shootings in america have involved that specific weapon. and have led to complete carnage. it's that that people want to remove. it's not regular guns, handguns, or pistols.
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what is your answer for that. >> first of all, guns are prohibited in the airplane. they're also prohibited in the school. what we've got to make sure is somebody who violates the law, that children are still protected. that's why we have federal air marshals on airplanes and that's why we have more security that we need to apply to our school. let me come back to the issue of safety. my job is to come up with some good solutions to help our school districts and our states to look at. when the president comes out with his proposal, i do hope he provides a federal partnership for providing funds for training of the armed presence in the schools to help our local school districts. right now, virtually every school district in america is looking at better ways to assure the safety of their children. >> but here's the
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counterargument. here's the counterargument, it's not you. we have had armed security at schools and universities before, and it just hasn't been effective. at columbine, at virginia tech, most notably, ft. hood, the most protected place on earth, almost, you had a complete outrage and massacre there. just having armed people around isn't necessarily the answer. i read a very convincing argument against it today, for example, with somebody saying you have these people, they get trained. they're armed. and they're concerned, not quite sure what they're looking for, and they get an odd looking character turns up. you could end up with all sorts of really unfortunate incidents. how do you kind of regulate that? >> certainly, you need to look beyond simply a trained, armed presence. the training is critically important in a sensitive
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environment. i think we ought to have more standardized training and enhanced training for anyone who is a protective person at a school. but secondly, right now, we have about one third of the schools that have an armed presence. in california, i spoke to a school resource officer there, i believe they have about 500 in los angeles. they have them in philadelphia. do you want to pull those all out of the schools and not have any armed presence there when the local school district says it's important to protect our children? but it is more than that. that's why we need to look at -- >> do you think -- >> let me finish my answer, please. we need to look at the architecture of the schools. we need to look at other technology, how to keep them safe. it's much more than just being an armed presence. >> what are you going to arm them with that's going to protect these children from a deranged young person with an ar-15 that can fire up to 100 bullets in a minute? what weapon will you give your trained security people? >> we'll give them what they need to get to do the job to protect the children. >> right. just to clarify, would you give them ar-15s? >> this is not -- this is the -- experts, school safety experts, national law enforcement people,
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they would recommend what is the best way to protect the children in this environment. >> what would you do? >> i would give them a weapon so they could take the shooter out. and if there's not -- >> i don't want -- i just want to clarify whether 120,000 armed people you're going to put into america's schools, are they going to be armed with semiautomatic assault rifles, too? that seems to be the only logical way they have any chance of getting someone with a killing machine. you give them a handgun, they have one, two, three bullets at a guy who is firing possibly 100 a minute. i'm asking you just to clarify, you're would you give the people you're going to train an ar-15 assault rifle? >> i disagree with your point. i think a person trained with a firearm can be very effective. and also just like somebody doesn't rush into the cockpit of
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an airplane because they know there's a pilot who very well could have a weapon there, i believe you have to have layers of security in the schools. we're going to be looking at the experts as to how this can be done. we're going to give them model training programs. we're going to give the schools greater resources online. this is a very serious effort in school safety. and i hope the vice president, whenever he makes the recommendations to the president, includes school safety as a large part of the equation as to what needs to be done in the future. >> quickly, you don't think removing ar-15s would remove safety? >> i think congress could pass a half a dozen laws just like they did with the ban on columbine, yet the tragedy occurred. so they can pass laws, but i think we'll make more progress and keep our children safer if we focus on how we can better provide a secure environment in the schools, and that's what i'm
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addressing. >> okay, mr. hutchinson, thank you very much. i appreciate it. coming up, the man who says the nra has held hostage for years. john walsh of "america's most wanted" said this country can't put up with gun violence any longer.
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like so many of the parents of sandy hook, my next guest also knows the pain of losing a son to crime. john walsh is the host of "america's most wanted." you know ava, and very much the thoughts of the nra generally, their answer to all of these
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massacres is more guns. what do you think of it? >> first, i have to say i'm thankful that you keep this dialogue going. it has to be a civil dialogue. i think it's evading all of the important issues by saying we're going to put more guns in schools. the nra is supported by the gun manufacturers, and i know aaa and he's a good man. is that the way you're going to make a sandy hook stop and say we'll just sell, what, hundreds of thousands of more guns and put armed guards in every school in america? >> i thought the president had it absolutely right today. he made it clear there's a direct link between the fear driven by the nra and others after these massacres, the fear is quite deliberately put out there to drive more sales to make more money. it's a commercial deal. >> they're the most powerful marketing tool in capitol hill.
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i have been up there for years walking the halls and trying to get congress to do reasonable things for victims, change the laws because the level of violence is so unacceptable. you have said it a million times, we have 20 times more violent than the closest first-world country. we're the richest, most powerful country in the world, and we have the most violence, the most guns, and the biggest problems we seem to keep skirting because congress won't do anything about it. they're in gridlock. >> when people say they're for the second amendment. they're entitled. what do you say? >> i'm a gun owner. i have a ranch, i shoot quail. i don't need an ak-57, i don't need a 50-bullet clip. i have shotguns, i have pistols. no one is ever going to take my guns away. there's no dictator, no country that is going to take over america and take our guns away. this is reasonable, thoughtful,
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the ban on assault weapons is a reasonable start. we have to start somewhere, piers. >> that's what i feel. the inclination to do nothing, to allow the proliferation of weapons, these military-style weapons, that's what they are. and people who say, what about handguns? handgun have a completely different capability and power than these ar-15s. he shot up an entire movie theater. >> and bought 6,000 rounds of ammunition. >> with no regulation. >> these guns are for killing other men. i hunt men down for a living. i caught 1,200 guys in 30 countries. i have profiled some of the biggest socio paths in the world, and one in five americans are mentally ill, but we have no mental health service anywhere in the united states.
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>> when you mix that with 40% of all gun sales in america having no checks, no background check, no database, nothing, i found that a terrifying cocktail. >> no one wants to take anybody's guns away. those two boys went to that gun show before columbine. they weren't old enough to buy a gun. they got a girl who was 18 that had a driver's license. nobody asked them, what are you going do with those semiautomatic weapons? why do you need so many rounds of ammunition? and the next day, they went and killed all those people. and it's happened multiple, multi, multiple times. background checks don't exist. we need better background checks. i have no problem waiting ten days for my permit. i have no problem taking a psychological test, i have no problem taking a gun course.
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we need better background. >> you made complete sense. please come back and we'll talk about it more. coming up, a hollywood star who owns guns and is also taking a stand on assault weapons. rob lowe joins me next. [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the next... not so much. but that's okay -- you're covered with great ideas like optional better car replacement from liberty mutual insurance. total your car and we give you the money to buy one a model year newer.
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you're an independent and you sort of said, look, i want this guys to court me as a voter. in that courting process, what should they be doing? how are they going to hook you in? what are you looking for?
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>> they need to personally come to my house, piers. they need to come over and watch football with me and spend quality face time. i'm no different than an iowa farmer. i deserve the exact same respect as an iowa corn farmer. politics is retail. come to my house. >> a year ago when the absurdity came, rob lowe talked about the race and his passion for politics. good to have you back. >> none of the candidates took me up on my offer. not one of them came to my house. >> nobody called, nobody rang? >> i was sad. >> what do you make of the race in the end? >> i was -- i was really surprised that it wasn't closer. >> yeah? >> i can't believe that president obama turned out bigger numbers than he thought -- than a lot of people thought he would. i was surprised. all of a sudden, it felt like it
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was called and it was over. i looked around and thought, it's over, that quick? >> i thought of you because i was watching the entire "west wing" all seven seasons. what was great about the bartlett campaign, he was a great campaigner, obama won in the end because he runs a brilliant campaign. >> he does, and he communicates and he connects with people. people can say he's aloof. we have heard the knocks on president obama, maybe they're true and maybe they're not, but the guy can act. that's going to carry. >> what do you make of his nomination so far? we have kerry state, brennan, cia. >> i'm very happy about john kerry. john is a friend and i think he'll be great in the job. he's clearly wanted it. although, you know, hillary has been amazing. what an amazing -- i think the
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appointments are good. i think the defense will be a fight. that will be fun to watch. >> let's talk about guns. i have been talking about this a lot. particularly since sandy hook, but before that. you're an independent in many ways, but what do you make of the gun debate. i'll tell you why i ask. in britain, it's not a political thing, never has been. never left or right. it's more of a human reaction when things happen, we have to do something. why is it so political in america? >> it's a part, i think, of how our country was formed. we did have to take up arms to form our country. >> to get rid of us. >> i didn't want to say it, but if you're going to bring it up, yeah, to get you guys out. there's that. it's in our constitution. look, i own a gun. you know, i'm gone a lot. i have a wife, i have two kids.
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i know how to keep them. they're in a gun safe. >> how many do you have? >> three. >> what type? >> i don't have an assault weapon. >> you have handguns? >> exactly. and i'm a sportsman. and i shoot skeet, and i grew up in the midwest. that's a part of my culture. i understand them in a way that perhaps people living in more urban areas don't have that history. >> but i totally understand why you would do that. why you think you have the right to do that under the second amendment and i have total respect for that. you understand your family and hunting and shooting or whatever that may be. i don't get the assault weapon thing. i don't get why responsible gun owners in this country aren't rising up together and saying, you know what, they have no place in a civilized society. >> i know you have really been
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leading a charge on this. i haven't heard anyone articulate to me what would really be the problem with an assault weapons ban. we had it before. >> you had kind of a woolly ban. it had so many exemptions to it. there were hundreds of thousands of them still on the street, it's not a ban. in britain, when we had our sandy hook, there was a ban, and they got taken away. when you were found with one, you were taken to jail. >> they literally came and took them away. >> this confiscation causes mass hysteria in america. you are not taking my guns. >> it's a complicated issues. one of the problems for me, and i know i have heard you talk about this, and i'm glad, is that i think the mental health, parenting, personal responsibility. >> video games. >> first person video shooting, admittedly, i missed that generationally. i never played them, i don't get
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it. my kids do. i think kids growing up, blowing people away blood, pulp everywhere, and then turning it off and having a sandwich, i don't think that's -- i don't think that is good. and i think that it needs to be a large conversation, and it sounds like we're starting to have it as a nation. and that can only be good. >> as a gun owner, you would have no problem if president obama said i really want to push for these assault rifles in particular to be taken out of circulation? >> look, i wouldn't because -- i like guns, and i don't own an assault rifle. i wouldn't know what to do with one, i wouldn't know why i would want one. i also see if you're a law-abiding person and you bought it under the law, having it taken from you, i can see why people would have a problem with that. but if they don't do that, as
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you point out, it's not really a ban, is it? >> no. >> and i'm no social anthropologist, but i do think that the last thing viewers want is another hollywood actor telling them anything about guns. pro or con. >> let's take a break. i want to come back and talk about your new role, which is as the prosecutor in the casey anthony case, which was an equally emotive issue. divided the nation. i want to know what it feels like to be that guy. junior seau and i became friends when we mentor indianapolis teens. i took them to the statehouse, and junior gave them autographed jerseys. they prefer jim. >> that was "parks & recreation" his new tv movie, "prosecuting casey anthony." i watched your last one, drew peterson tv movie. >> thank you.
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they prefer jim. >> that was "parks & recreation" his new tv movie, "prosecuting casey anthony." i watched your last one, drew peterson tv movie. >> thank you. >> you were compellingly evil. have you a very polarizing figure, about whom there remains a lot of doubt and no one is quite sure, as they were with drew peterson, whether they were really guilty or not, most people think they are. did you follow the case as it happened? were you enthralled as anybody else? >> i watch more cable news than any human. i see too much of it, i just do. >> you can never see too much of that. >> you would think that, and i understand that, that's perfectly fine.
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you couldn't escape it if you wanted to when it was on. in terms of the day by day mind minutia of the trial -- when i read the prosecutor's book, i was really surprised about some of the twists and turns, overreach and some of the things to lead us where the country was so shocked about the verdict. >> what is so fascinating about him, 68-70 homicide convictions, almost a perfect record, and everybody assumed he was going to have another tick. another conviction. and there was real shock when she walked. did you meet him? >> he came to visit the day i did the closing argument. >> really? >> so he watched you deliver -- >> deliver his closing argument.
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a direct transcript what he actually said. and he's by the monitor while i'm out in the courtroom, an exact replica of the courtroom in orlando. it was pretty surreal. >> what did he say to you? >> i almost didn't want to go back and see him for fear he would give me the oh, boy face. but i think he was pretty happy. >> of course he will be happy. he has rob lowe playing him. jesus, how much better can it get? i want you for my lifetime movie? >> i'm there, my friend. >> it's going to be called "deported." >> it will never happen. i won't let it. >> let's take a look at "prosecuting casey antenoriy." >> i don't see why we need all of mystery here. >> just tell us what happened. >> all right. the truth is kaleigh was never murdered.
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>> okay. >> she accidentally drowned in the pool on june 16th. and casey trusted someone she never should have to take care of it. >> like who? >> george anthony. >> you know what? bring it. >> would you have personally convicted casey anthony the more you know about the case. >> it's my personal opinion that she absolutely had something to do with her daughter's death. i don't know if it was an accident or premeditated. that i don't know to this date. but there is no doubt within my mind at all that she is responsible. >> i spoke to her briefly, arranged by one of her defense attorneys, and like all of these kinds of evil characters that get portrayed that way,
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underneath it, there was this kind of quite softly spoken, very normal sounding woman, and who obviously had been through complete hell and probably will be for the rest of her life. do you have any sympathy for people caught up in these things? >> this would be a tough one. i'm a father, i have got two kids, child neglect is an unthinkable thing, and child murder is off of the scale. >> it looks riveting. i'm looking forward to seeing the whole thing. airingn the january 19th at 8:00 p.m. on lifetime and "parks & recreation" 8:30 on nbc. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work.
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and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade.
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